Rice

Sweet and Spicy Seitan Suya and Coconut Rice {Cameroon}

Sweet and Spicy Seitan Suya.  How’s that for alliteration?

Aside from the Cocoa San Rival, this is my favorite and it takes 10 times less time.  You’re going to love it.  I challenge you to feed it to a meat-eater and see if they can figure out that they are actually eating wheat.  If anyone does this, please let me know how it goes!

When researching Cameroon recipes, I just kept coming back to suya–strips of flank steak grilled on a skewer, covered in a sweet and spicy peanut mixture.

Seitan Suya (Vegan), Enough for 6 skewers

Ingredients:

  • One 8 oz box strips or chunks of seitan
  • 1 tsp cane sugar
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 cup ground peanuts
  • oil for brushing (I used peanut oil)

Directions:

  1. Mix sugar, spices, salt, and peanuts together.
  2. Rub onto seitan strips.
  3. Place strips/chunks onto bamboo or metal skewers.
  4. Cover and let marinate for as much time as you can stand it.
  5. Preheat grill or oven.  We have NO outdoor space here, so I grilled on the rack in the oven at 425*
  6. Rub oil on skewers to prevent them from sticking to the rack/grill.
  7. Grill for approximately 4 minutes on each side.

Love cooking with seitan; you don’t have to worry if your meat’s rare in the middle.  It just has to be warmed through.

We ate our skewers with a coconut rice, made with carrots, yellow bell peppers, and thyme.  The topping is a bit of the leftover peanuts mixed with the spice mixture.  It added a desirable crunch to the rice.

These skewers and empanadas are definitely on my make-after-the-project list!

Tomorrow, the African recipes come to a halt, albeit a very one.  Mezze platter coming your way!

Categories: African Food, East African Food, Food, Rice, Vegan, Vegetarian | 3 Comments

A Borrowed Bobotie Recipe {South Africa}

two slices of vegetarian bobotie

Ignore all typos that may follow.  I’m blogging from my favorite Knoxville coffee shop (don’t be alarmed by their stub of a website).  Their lattes are potent.  And I am weak and very susceptible to the side effects of coffee.  I’m jittery, overly excited about everything, and typing faster than I can actually read it.  My thoughts are absolutely everywhere and refusing to coalesce.  And I’m only halfway through the iced soy vanilla latte bliss.  Beware.

Moving on, I am certainly not alone in my plot to try vegetarian recipes from around the world.    For something like 24 hours, I thought the concept of The Pearl Project was my own.  But when researching content, recipes, ideas for my blog, I quickly stumbled upon the many foodies with similar goals that have come before me.  There are oodles of cookbooks, hundreds of bloggers doing a very similar thing.  Some are great; some mediocre; some very, um, lack luster (the best of intentions).  I do not know that anyone else forced the all countries in one year time crunch onto themselves, however…they were smarter than me.

My point is that while I often feel the need to reinvent the wheel (making my own recipes), when I find a really great-looking wheel, I just smooth it out to my own liking.  Enter: One World Vegetarian Cookbook.

(Source)

Usually, I find great recipes from a country and have to figure out how to make them vegetarian. While this book does not have a recipe from every single country, it does cover a good bit of territory.

For today’s post, I found an already vegetarian South African bobotie recipe in this book.  Since the recipe is not my own and I don’t want be a copyright jerk (although, frankly, Disney and the Mickey Mouse copyright extension drive me nuts as a little librarian lady), I will not post it for the world.  But you should check this book out from your local public library!  (If you use the same public library as me, you’re going to have to reserve it to force me to not renew it).

Bobotie is traditionally a meatloaf with curry flavor and other Indian spices.  What a representation of the mixing pot that is South African cuisine.  Hello, combination of English and Indian food cultures.  Troth Wells’ version is a lentil/bean loaf with the same flavors.

My only substitutions for his recipe were swapping milk with almond milk (I eat cheese like crazy, but don’t ever have cow’s milk in the fridge…go figure), and pinto beans for black-eyed peas.  It worked.  Good going on this recipe, Troth Wells.

We had a lot of other things going on in this meal, besides the bobotie.  Plain yogurt, saffron rice with raisins, mango (my first golden mango back there), mango chutney (courtesy of Trader Joe’s–wish Kville had a TJ), and tomatoes, barely-dressed (that’s right, boys, they are the tomatoes you’re parents warned you about when you went to college as an innocent freshman; when tomatoes dress like that, they are just asking to be eaten) with vinegar, salt, and pepper.

This meal snapped me back out of easy meal mode, as it took a bit more effort.  The ingredient list was long; the seasoning more complex than the salt, pepper, and peanuts of the last post.  But it was worth making to experience the combination of cuisines.  And if you’re really dying for this recipe and cannot find a recipe you like online, send me an e-mail–I’ll share with you off-blog to avoid that pesky copyright infringement.

Latte is almost gone.

Categories: African Food, Cookbooks, Food, Recommended Recipe Sources, Rice, Southern Africa, Vegetarian | Leave a comment

Sweet Orange Persian Rice and Pomegranate Soup {Iran}

This post has been migrated to my new location. Stop by for some Persian food at:
http://www.therestoflhistoire.com/2012/03/23/jewelled-persian-rice-and-vegetarian-pomegranate-stew/

Categories: Food, Holidays, Middle Eastern Food, Rice, Soups, Uncategorized, Vegetarian | 1 Comment

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