Monthly Archives: April 2012

Sweet and Spicy Seitan Suya and Coconut Rice {Cameroon}

Sweet and Spicy Seitan Suya.  How’s that for alliteration?

Aside from the Cocoa San Rival, this is my favorite and it takes 10 times less time.  You’re going to love it.  I challenge you to feed it to a meat-eater and see if they can figure out that they are actually eating wheat.  If anyone does this, please let me know how it goes!

When researching Cameroon recipes, I just kept coming back to suya–strips of flank steak grilled on a skewer, covered in a sweet and spicy peanut mixture.

Seitan Suya (Vegan), Enough for 6 skewers

Ingredients:

  • One 8 oz box strips or chunks of seitan
  • 1 tsp cane sugar
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 cup ground peanuts
  • oil for brushing (I used peanut oil)

Directions:

  1. Mix sugar, spices, salt, and peanuts together.
  2. Rub onto seitan strips.
  3. Place strips/chunks onto bamboo or metal skewers.
  4. Cover and let marinate for as much time as you can stand it.
  5. Preheat grill or oven.  We have NO outdoor space here, so I grilled on the rack in the oven at 425*
  6. Rub oil on skewers to prevent them from sticking to the rack/grill.
  7. Grill for approximately 4 minutes on each side.

Love cooking with seitan; you don’t have to worry if your meat’s rare in the middle.  It just has to be warmed through.

We ate our skewers with a coconut rice, made with carrots, yellow bell peppers, and thyme.  The topping is a bit of the leftover peanuts mixed with the spice mixture.  It added a desirable crunch to the rice.

These skewers and empanadas are definitely on my make-after-the-project list!

Tomorrow, the African recipes come to a halt, albeit a very one.  Mezze platter coming your way!

Categories: African Food, East African Food, Food, Rice, Vegan, Vegetarian | 3 Comments

Muamba de Galinha (Seitan) and Funge {Angola}

You may have noticed the African kick I’m on.  Chad, South Africa, Tunisia, and São Tomé and Príncipe.  I’m sticking with it.  Today’s post is Angola, and tomorrow’s is Cameroon.  If you’re worried I’ll exhaust all of the African countries too quickly, put your mind at ease.  There are 54 countries on the continent.

Muamba de Galinha is actually chicken stew.  I’ve really been enjoying seitan as a protein replacement lately, and think it works best in the place of stewed meats.  Thus, Muamba de Seitan.

Stews typically don’t thrill me, to be honest.  So I was surprised by how much I liked this one.

It comes full of garlic, chili peppers, onions, tomatoes, squash, and okra.  There’s also a bit of lemon juice, palm oil, and and chili powder.  Typically, this would be made with a palm soup base, but I wasn’t able to get my hands on any in time.  Maybe it would have added more to the dish, but since I’ve never had it before, I didn’t notice it missing.

Curious about the cloud of cornmeal floating in the soup?  That’s my lazy version of funge (it usually has a much better shape than mine).  Funge is the Angolan version of the thick porridge African staple.  Depending upon the country, this porridge might be made of millet, cornmeal, or manioc.  Remember the baton de manioc I made?  That’s another version of the staple porridge.  You’ll see more versions in the upcoming months.  Often, the porridge is used as a scoop for a stew or dish, but as you can see, I’m a creature of habit and have spoons handy.

I preferred the taste of the funge to the baton de manioc, but I have a hunch that I’ll prefer the yam-based fufu even better.

Happy Monday to you.  Meet the work week head on.

Categories: African Food, Food, Soups, Southern Africa, Vegan, Vegetarian | Leave a comment

Sweet Potato Omelettes {São Tomé and Príncipe}

Saturday mornings (yeah, I pre-posted again–I realize it’s actually Sunday when this goes up) are the time to up the ante for breakfast.

I want to visit São Tomé and Príncipe.  I love Wikipedia and its public domain photos (yep, more nerdy copyright talk for you).  Check out the country’s highest peak:

Who wouldn’t want to visit this volcanic peak?  (Don’t speak up if you do not…it’s rhetorical.  I swear I welcome all other comments, though).

São Tomé and Príncipe is a small African island country, and you might have guessed correctly from the “São”, used to be a Portuguese colony.  When sugar became all the rage (read Sugar Changed the World), the Portuguese saw these islands as an opportunity.  There were no inhabitants of the islands originally, and sugar production needed workers, so the Portuguese captured slaves on the mainland to work on the islands.  The culture of this nation, thus, is a fusion of Portuguese and African cultures.

As food is concerned, sweet potatoes, plantains, and bananas are major staples.  Coconut water is abundant.  Sweet potato souffles (I will attempt sometime) and sweet potato omelettes are common.  These are the other reasons I want to visit.

As I understand it, sweet potato omelettes are not really a breakfast food there.  But I couldn’t help myself this morning.

Add grated sweet potato and garlic to your egg mix.  (I’ve been a stickler for omega-3 eggs lately).

The sweet potato looks like grated cheddar cheese.  Which made me think I should add a little cheese.  I added some local white sharp cheddar from Sweetwater Valley Farm in Philadelphia, Tennessee.  Excellent cheese, by the way, and is available at Just Ripe on Union Ave.

I did want to have some coconut water for breakfast, so I could better imagine my island breakfast, but alas, I could not find it this morning.  Some orange juice and a banana did the trick, though.

The added mass of the sweet potato makes a two egg omelette seem enormous, even though the massive plate I have it on in the picture dwarfs the omelette.  I had to hand mine over to Jordan to finish this morning.

This breakfast is no joke.  No April Fools here.

Watch yourself today.  Don’t try picking up change you see on the ground.  It’s most likely glued to the sidewalk and someone will be laughing at you.

Categories: African Food, Breakfast, Food, Vegetarian, West African Food | 1 Comment

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